The art and science of communications: From strategic to personal

Monthly Archives: July 2010

Terrorism and New Media: Building a Research Network
Dublin City University: Wednesday 8 – Thursday 10 Sept 2010
Whether Bin Laden, al-Qaida’s Egyptian theorist Ayman al-Zawahiri and their colleagues are on a mountain in the Hindu Kush or living with their beards shaved off in a suburb of Karachi no longer matters to the organisation. They can inspire and guide a worldwide movement without physically meeting their followers – without even knowing who they are.
– Paul Eedle

Conference Organisers

Rationale

The purpose of this conference is to bring together academics from a broad range of disciplines with policy-makers and security practitioners that have knowledge and/or expertise that can facilitate advances in the study of Terrorism and New Media, particularly the Internet, in novel ways.

Programme

This is the first academic conference to subject the relationship between terrorism and new media, particularly the Internet, to truly multi-disciplinary scrutiny. The one-day conference (Wednesday, 8 September) will feature a series of panels and a number of plenary addresses. The conference will be followed on Thursday, 9 September by a workshop devoted to the robust debate and analysis of currently ‘hot’ topics in the realm of terrorism and the Internet, particularly the question of the role of the Internet in processes of radicalisation.

Full Programme Details »

Call for Papers

We welcome papers or panels reporting on innovative research into any aspect of terrorism and new media. We particularly welcome papers or panels that report novel results or describe and employ innovative methodological approaches.

Papers or panels on the following topics will be of particular interest:

  • Online radicalisation
  • The Internet and recruitment
  • Old terrorism and new media
  • Methodologies for terrorism-related Internet research
  • Terrorism informatics
  • Network analysis and online terrorist activity
  • New Internet tools/platforms and radicalisation/terrorism (for example, online gaming, video-sharing, photo-sharing, social networking, micro-blogging, online payment mechanisms, etc.)
  • Cyberterrorism
  • Violent Islamism and the Internet
  • The content and functioning of jihadi Internet forums
  • Jihadi video producers and content
  • Children/youth, terrorism, and new media
  • Women/gender, terrorism, and new media
  • Case studies of particular groups’ use of new media (e.g. al-Qaeda, FARC, Hamas, Hizbollah, dissident Irish Republicans, etc.)
  • Policy/legislative responses to terrorists’ online presence
  • Critical responses to research on, reporting of, and governmental responses to the conjunction of terrorism and the Internet
  • Ethical issues surrounding online terrorism-related research

Perspectives from any academic discipline are welcomed, particularly: communications, computer science, cultural studies, information science, international relations, internet studies, law, media studies, philosophy, political science, psychology, and sociology.

Authors of individual papers should submit a 300-word abstract at our proposal submission page on or before 17 May 2010.

Media, War & ConflictA selection of accepted papers will be considered for publication in a special issue of the journal Media, War & Conflict.

Travel Funding for Graduate Students

The Center on Public Diplomacy at the Annenberg School, University of Southern California (USC) will provide US$700 in sponsorship for a graduate student to attend at *and blog* from the conference for the Center. Graduate students wishing to apply for this funding should indicate same when submitting their abstract.

The conference organisers are also in a position to provide a number of travel grants for graduate students. Support may be requested for transportation and accommodation. Students should provide a breakdown of the estimated cost of travel and accommodation upon submitting an application. Graduate students wishing to apply for funding can do so when submitting an abstract. Award decisions will be made by 14 June 2010.

More travel funding details »

Deadlines

  • Abstract deadline: 300 words to be submitted HERE by 17 May 2010
  • Registration: from 1 June 2010
  • Decision on abstracts: 14 June 2010
  • Decision on travel funding awards: 14 June 2010
  • Early bird registration deadline: 8 July
  • Hotel reservation deadline at conference rate: 19 July 2010
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BP Oil Spill, Toyota Recall Put Spotlight on Reputational Risk – Via Suite101

The vanishing act in 2001 of energy giant Enron and Big Five auditor Arthur Andersen in the wake of a fraudulent accounting scandal shows how real the threat is. For corporate risk managers, the question is whether reputational risk can be managed directly or whether it results from other types of failure.

The situation faced by BP as the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico ran on for weeks with increasing amounts of pollution washing ashore was a collapse of its reputation due to operational failures in the original oil rig accident and the subsequent cleanup effort.

The stock price plunged as the oil producer, which can trace its origins back to 1908, faced a battery of legal and liability claims that threatened to empty even its very deep pockets.

Companies sometimes have to adopt massive and costly measures to stem the threat of reputational risk. In late 2009 and early 2010, Toyota had to recall some 9 million vehicles after a number of fatal accidents were attributed to unintended acceleration. The auto giant also had to suspend sales of several models while fixing the problems.

Reputation - you've got to work at it.

Banks, the quintessential managers of risk, have wrestled with the problem of how to measure reputational risk and how to safeguard against it. Many banks consider it an effect of failures in the three major risk categories – credit risk, market risk, and operational risk, says staff writer David Benyon in a specialist publication on bank risk management.

But operational risk itself was considered impossible to measure just a decade ago, Benyon adds, so that some risk managers anticipate an evolution in assessing and managing reputational risk.

Goldman Sachs acknowledged the issue in a filing earlier this year with the Securities and Exchange Commission after a spate of negative publicity about its actions in selling the mortgage-backed securities blamed for causing the 2008-09 financial crisis.

The “adverse publicity … can also have a negative impact on our reputation and on the morale and performance of our employees, which could adversely affect our businesses and results of operations,” Goldman said in the filing.

The Spanish bank Santander spent an estimated 500 million euros in early 2009 to make good the losses by investors in one of its funds that placed money with Bernie Madoff, an investment manager who pleaded guilty to running a Ponzi scheme that led to investor losses of some $50 billion altogether.

Sometimes these efforts fall short and lead to the company’s demise, as was the case with Enron and Andersen. In June 2010, the security firm Blackwater put itself up for sale after various efforts to repair damage to its reputation from actions in Iraq were unsuccessful.

A roundtable discussion at the Association of Insurance and Risk Managers in April found that risk managers overwhelmingly agree that reputational risk is important to their organizations, but only 6% felt they were leaders in this field.

While Toyota seemed on the road to recovery after its decisive action, the eventual fates of BP and Goldman Sachs remained to be determined in mid-2010. What was certain is that corporate risk managers will be paying more attention to reputational risk.

Sources:

“Why chatter matters,” by David Benyon,OpRisk & Compliance, January 2010.

“A good name? Priceless,” Strategic Risk, April 1, 2010

Darrell Delamaide – Via Suite101


Nation Branding in a Globalized World:  The Economic, Political, and Cultural Dimensions of Nation Branding

Berlin, 29th July –- 1st August 2010

Nation Branding in a Globalized World” is a 4 day international conference being held by the Institute for Cultural Diplomacy that will explore the concept of nation branding and consider its importance in contemporary international relations. The conference is based on the growing influence of nation brands and the increasing importance placed on such brands by politicians, private sector representatives, and other stakeholders in global politics and economics. The program aims to focus on the challenges and opportunities of strengthening a country’s image abroad, and the impact of such activity on international relations.

Nation Branding in a Globalized World” will consist of 4 complementary components:

What’s in a brand?

The program will begin by exploring in detail the history and development of term “nation brand”, its definition, and the extent to which the term is open to interpretation. The opening part of the conference will also address the extent to which a country is able to shape its own brand, and what factors may enable or hinder this process.

New Actors, New Strategies

Having considered the meaning of the term “nation brand”, the second part of the program will move to analyse the different actors involved in shaping a country’s image abroad – including governments, private sector companies, individuals, and civil society organisations. The interaction between these actors, and the ways in which they can influence a country’s brand, will be considered in detail.

Nation Branding ... more than just pretty logos

Economic, Political, and Cultural Benefits

The penultimate component part of the conference will explore the advantages for a country of having a strong nation brand – with particular reference to economics, politics, and the cultural sector. Case studies from across the world will be considered by an interdisciplinary group of speakers.

Nation Branding in a Globalized World

The final part of the program will consider the complex relationship between the process of globalisation and the generation of nation brands. It will explore the challenge of combining strong nation brands in an increasingly interdependent world, and will develop best practice guidelines for countries seeking to engage in nation branding.

Participant Papers – The Institute for Cultural Diplomacy encourages research and progressive thought into the fields of culture, globalization and international relations. In this regard, the ICD is welcoming participants of the Conference to submit papers on this subject. The papers can cover any topic within these fields, according to your own particular interests and passions. Participants can submit work that they have completed in the past for other purposes, ongoing research or a paper written specifically for the conference. Groups of students are also allowed to submit collaborative pieces of work

Further information:      www.icd-nationbranding.org